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Automatic inclusion in the beta testing

  1. This is a comment, not a question. In general I'm extremely happy with WordPress.com. But this upgrade to 3.1 is very disappointing.

    The upgrade has introduced not one but two significant bugs. They relate to inserting links:
    http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/problem-inserting-links-in-a-post
    and to changing layouts within a template:
    http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/cant-change-template-on-twenty-ten-anymore

    This would be acceptable if they occurred only with little-used templates. But they occur with 2010, which is a WordPress template and is the default template for new blogs at WordPress.

    This might be acceptable if it were only with little-used browsers. But the bugs occur with FF, IE, and Chrome.

    On top of this, the blog entry at:
    http://en.blog.wordpress.com/2010/11/19/linking-sorting-paging/
    blithely asserts that "the lucky users of WordPress.com are automatically included in the beta testing."

    Sorry, but my blogs are production sites, not test sites. Beta testing at WordPress should require an opt-in, or allow an opt-out, if changes are liable to introduce bugs in important templates across multiple browsers.

    Mike Carroll

  2. @greenspun, I could not agree more.

  3. opinion/
    WordPress.com has always been the beta testing ground for stand alone WordPress. (Check out my blog's tagline.) It comes with the free territory here.

    If staying out of the beta testing is that important to you, self-hosted would be the way to go. The standalone version of WordPress only gets the upgrade after the beta testing here is done. That way you can upgrade (or not) your self-hosted site to the latest standalone version of WordPress with the bugs already squashed.
    /opinion

  4. Being at WP.com means being a beta-testing guinea pig. It always has, since I came here almost five years ago.

  5. You know, just because they have always beta tested here does not mean that it doesn't put people here, some of whom depend on their blogs as tools for their business and such, in a world of hurt when wordpress rolls out buggy updates like this one. Many of these people chose to have their blogs here because they didn't want to have to maintain their own install of wordpress, they wanted to have one less worry.

    The big problem here was that the bugs hit bloggers where they lived, in the editor for the most part, and everyone's posting came to a sudden halt, and for some apparently it is still a problem (IE7).

    And this episode certainly isn't going to improve the relationship with all those live space refugees that were exiled by Microsoft, most of whom are likely using some version of IE.

    Sure the basic service here is free, and for those of us who have been here for a time, we know this can happen, but for people who have not experienced this, it comes as quite a shock.

    If this had been thoroughly vetted on a parallel wordpress.COM system, even a small one with just a few staff test blogs, most of the more serious bugs should have been discovered before it was rolled out on the unsuspecting bloggers here.

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