Need help? Check out our Support site, then


Can't get custom header working...

  1. mrbilldingblocks
    Member

    I'm using the "Painter 1.1" theme, and am trying to upload a custom header. I select my image and click upload, but it keeps coming back with the following:

    Unable to create directory /var/virtual/web/w1788/html/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/10. Is its parent directory writable by the server?

    The blog is going through another domain name (domain.com.au/blog) - perhaps I need to do something with my FTP settings?

    Any help is much appreciated!

  2. You did not specify a blog address or reason for posting when you created this topic.

    This support forum is for blogs hosted at WordPress.com. If your question is about a self-hosted WordPress blog then you'll find help at the WordPress.org forums.

    If you don't understand the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, you may find this information helpful.

    If you forgot to include a link to your blog, you can reply and include it below. It'll help people to answer your question.

    This is an automated message.

  3. You need to chmod the directory /wp-content/ to 777.

    Anyways, you're in the wrong forum.
    Next time, head on over to WordPress.org.

  4. chmodding the wp-content directory to 777? I can't tell you how bad an idea that is.

  5. Oi Vey!

  6. I can't either. Because I have no idea what it means.

  7. chmod 777 is a permissions setting for a folder or directory and it basically opens the folder up to the entire planet - probably even the universe.

    It is so way bad I can't even find the words.

  8. Yes, that's why you create the correct directory and chmod it back. I think 766 is ideal.

    Some from the codex:

    766 means that the directory is readable and writable by WordPress and any and all other users on your system. If 766 doesn't work, you can try 777, which makes all files and folders readable, writable, and executable by all users, groups, and processes.

    Some plugins require the /wp-content/ folder be made writeable. In some cases, this may require assigning 755 permissions or higher (e.g. 777 on some hosts).

  9. For directories, 755 is the maximum. 644 is the maximum you should set files to.

    If a plugin requires wp-content to be set at 777, the plugin is shit and should not be used. No half-way competent plugin designer would build a plugin that required that.

Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

About this Topic