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  1. People are not able to leave comments on my blogs without entering their WordPress log in, even when they no longer have a WordPress account. How can this be corrected? What is the work-around? This is the 2nd question I have submitted on this topic. I need to get this resolved quickly!
    Blog url: http://anniesgoathill.wordpress.com/

  2. Follow these steps:

    Dashboard > Settings > Discussion > Uncheck the "Users must be registered and logged in to comment" box > Click save.

  3. That box is unchecked, and always has been.

    Thank you, ardpete

  4. Ah I see what you mean. I left a test comment on your most recent post (feel free to delete it), which posted fine however that's not registered to a WordPress account, when I logged out and tried the same thing using the e-mail address registered to this blog it asked me to log in. Even when users no longer have a blog they still have a WordPress account and if they are using an e-mail that's on the WordPress database they are asked to sign in, I believe this is done to avoid impersonators. A work around is to have users use an e-mail address that isn't registered to a former WordPress account.

    You could also try unchecking "Comment author must fill out name and e-mail" if that is checked.

  5. This could be part of a larger issue. I am finding that some settings are being ignored. e.g. Settings/Discussion/

    Comments should be displayed with the newer comments at the top of each page

    No matter whether I set newer or older I get older comments listed last so users have to scroll to the bottom of the page to see what's current.

    Additionally, I am getting regular comments diverted into the "spam" queue despite having checked "Comment author must have a previously approved comment". Further, I can no longer "approve" something in the spam queue. I have to dig it out of "pending". Lots of extra / useless clicks.

  6. ardpete, I did uncheck the box a few days ago "Comment author must fill out name and e-mail." Unchecking that box did not help.

    Thank you for your insight, I understand what you are saying about commentors using a different email address, one that was never linked to WordPress.

    The last comment posted, from the user La Shonda, was posted by me. She sent an email to let me know that she no longer knows her WordPress log in information and therefore could not leave a comment. I used my WordPress log in, her email address, and was able to leave the comment that (in appearances) was left by her.

    I also tested a comment, using my husband's email address, which has never been linked to a social media or blog account of any kind. I had no problems posting a comment.

    I pay for my WordPress services. I am not happy that people are not able to comment!

    Comments are a vital function of a blog!

    I may have to make a switch from WordPress, sadly, since interaction with my customers and other business owners is way too important to my business.

  7. This is what I posted, as a comment workaround on my blog today:

    Comment Instructions (If you experience difficulties leaving a comment, this may help: 1) You are not required to leave an email address - or - 2) Use an email address linked to your WordPress.com account and log into WordPress - or - 3) Use an email address that has never linked to a WordPress.com account. We apologize for any inconvenience. Please contact us if you need assistance.)

    This works, for now, but appears lame to me! This issue needs to be corrected.

  8. Thank you timethief.

    I am relieved to have a very clear picture of the changes now, and can at least offer my blog readers a workaround.

    I posted updated comment instructions on my blogs this morning. Now, hopefully, my blog readers will have enough patience with WordPress to begin leaving comments again!

    WordPress - this is making things way too difficult for the average blog reader. Think about this scenario: A business man/woman that plans out each moment of their busy workday is not going to devote 10-15 minutes in an attempt to leave comments. What happens to productivity then? What if the business person deleted their WordPress blog 3 years ago, do you think they are going to ask for a retrieved password and then return to the (my) blog to comment later? No, they are not. Reality speaks loudly here.

    At the very least, I hope your intentions are to continue resolving this issue. I understand the initial problem, and why the change was made, but surely it cannot remain a permanent solution?!

  9. Think of this scenario, someone begins leaving hateful comments using your name and your e-mail address on your friends blogs and there's nothing you can do about it because anyone can post using your e-mail address as reference. That's why this change was implemented. There is no other solution to stop this from happening, unless you have a better idea? It's not difficult for an educated person to either remember what their password was to their old WordPress account, create another account, use a different e-mail address or not use an e-mail address at all.

  10. I agree with you, ardpete, regarding the safety issues and why this change was implemented.

    Even though I appreciate your thoughts, "It's not difficult for an educated person to either remember what their password was to their old WordPress account, create another account, use a different e-mail address or not use an e-mail address at all," I disagree. Sometimes, through the course of years, a business person changes their blog, their website, etc..., many times. They are not (and I would not) bother with requesting my password sign in. I might, however, use a different e-mail address.

    One person tried to leave comments on my blog using numerous email addresses (3-4 in fact), none worked. Thankfully, she had patience, saw it being worth the time and effort, and came to me with the issue.

  11. No matter whether I set newer or older I get older comments listed last so users have to scroll to the bottom of the page to see what's current.

    Note that you may need to clear your local browser cache after making a settings change like that. Could you try clearing cache as a first troubleshooting step? If that doesn't help, can you please link to a post where this problem is currently happening?

    Additionally, I am getting regular comments diverted into the "spam" queue despite having checked "Comment author must have a previously approved comment". Further, I can no longer "approve" something in the spam queue. I have to dig it out of "pending". Lots of extra / useless clicks.

    The spam queue is separate from the comment author setting you mentioned. Spam is managed by Akismet. If you believe real comments are being marked as spam, the first best thing to do is to unspam them with the links provided. Do keep in mind that some spam comments can look very legit, especially generic compliment ones like "Great site!"

  12. @aghblog, thank you for your thoughtful notes in this thread. We are always working to keep WordPress.com easy to use as well as and safe and secure. We will take your feedback into account as we continue to update with both things in mind.

  13. I wonder what a browser cache has to do with the database of a web-application like WP but here goes:

    Could it be the server's cache?

    I am using WP Super Cache.

  14. @pogson
    This is not a WordPress.COM issue as your site isn't a .COM blog, you'd need to direct your support questions to http://wordpress.org/support

  15. jojocreativity
    Member

    I haven't gotten any comments on my blog yet. Can you check it out? Please. I would really appreciate it.

  16. @jojo0015
    This forum isn't for promotion purposes.

    Follow timethiefs simple guide if you want to build a following.

    http://en.support.wordpress.com/introduction/
    http://en.support.wordpress.com/getting-more-views-and-traffic/

    Here are 25 basic steps to take to increase traffic to your blog:
    1. Structure a reader and search engine blog;
    2. In blogging content is king create unique, high quality content so publish fresh content frequently;
    3. Learn basic SEO so you can use keywords effectively and apply basic SEO to your headlines, blog and posts;
    Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the visibility of a website or a web page in search engines via the “natural” or un-paid (“organic” or “algorithmic”) search results.
    4. Make your blog posts look professional;
    5. Create at least 4-6 pillar posts and continue to create pillar posts;
    Pillar posts are also referred to as flagship content. Pillar posts are comprehensive posts that offer great value to readers as the contents are timeless in nature. They define you as having authority in the niche you blog in.
    6. Select and link to appropriate anchor text;
    7. Leave meaningful comments on related blogs and encourage comments on your own blog;
    8. Develop relationships with other bloggers so you can build a blog readers’ community around your own blog;
    9. Support the blog centered communities on related blogs by commenting on them and promoting posts from them;
    10. Link to authoritative sources in your posts;
    11. Deep link to your earlier related posts in your new posts;
    12. Assign appropriate categories and tag your posts with care;
    13. Link to related authoritative blogs in your blogroll;
    14. Provide RSS feeds for subscribers;
    RSS (Rich Site Summary or really simple syndication) is a format for delivering regularly changing web content. Many news-related sites, weblogs and other online publishers syndicate their content as an RSS Feed to whoever wants it.
    15. Having a well designed theme is important, evaluate your theme for effectiveness, and if required, create a new header, make improvements or replace your theme and reduce page loading time;
    16. Avoid cluttering your blog with widgets that lack reader value and slow page loading time;
    17. Buy your own domain and domain mapping;
    18. Verify your blog with the three big search engines.
    19. Get organized, use an online to do list by developing a blogging workflow;
    20. Join social networks and social media sites like Facebook and use Twitter, Friendfeed and other Free RSS directories to promote your blog posts;
    21. Promote your blog through social networks, online groups, and selected directories;
    22. Develop a social media time management strategy and stick to it;
    23. Submit your latest pillar article to a blog carnival;
    24. Become a guest blogger on sites with higher page rank than your own site.
    25. Create newsletters and/or ebooks for your subscribers.

    Publish original content frequently and start commenting on related blogs. See here for how to locate them > global tags http://en.support.wordpress.com/global-tags/

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