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Dilemma

  1. I have my web page linked to my blog hosted on wordPress.com. I'm using the latter as a newsletter for products and services listed on my site. In an ideal world, I'd like the image or in other words, the "look and feel" of my site to be replicated across to my blog. But my WordPress.com hosted blog looks different to the look of the pages on my site because of the restricted themes (fonts and colours) available to the hosted WordPress.com blog.

    I'm considering the following options:-

    1. Leave things as they are
    2. Download WordPress and host it on my own hosted website.
    3. Drop my current WordPress blog and just post newsletter type items onto my site by update my "news" page regularly via ftp

    (1) still leaves me with the different "look and feel" issue.
    (2) means I have to get a lot more into HTML programming to try to get my own hosted blog to look like the rest of my site in terms of text and graphics and background colours etc, but I really don't have the time to do that right now as I'm running a business.
    (3) means time wasted doing regular ftp uploads and just posting news items means I don't really have an interactive blog any more where people can post comments

    Has anyone gone through this same decision - making process? Is option (2) really that tough and time - consuming to get into?

    Peter, UK

  2. Get hosted.

    If I were you I would move the whole site into a WP structure.
    Make a WP directory, build it all inside that with heaps of help as and when needed from the wordpress.org forums and then when you are ready for the unveiling move it to root and show it off.
    You get an easy to manage site.
    Your visitors get an easy to use site again
    And in the meantime you can still do what you do now.

    It depends - in part - on how attached you are to the current look you have (and there are 500+ themes out nthere for WP) and how attached to any linkage which may be going on.
    But it's not as daunting a task as you might think :)

  3. According to Emily's list at How To Blog there's more like 800-ish -- but yeah, weed out all the Kubrick clones and the complete tat and you're probably left with 500. Or less ;)

    That said, converting an existing HTML template to a WordPress theme is nowhere near as difficult as most people try to make out; the only really indispensible elements are an index file and a stylesheet. You might find that an easier way of approaching the task than trying to tweak somebody's theme to look like your current template; it all depends whether you'd rather get your hands dirty with CSS or with copy/pasting template tags.

  4. According to Emily's list at How To Blog there's more like 800-ish -- but yeah, weed out all the Kubrick clones and the complete tat and you're probably left with 500.

    And the ones that don't work and/ or have bad links, you wind up with even less. :)

    -drmike

  5. Okay so here's a newbie question for you beloved geeks to answer. How much would a rank beginner like myself with a "I don't want to learn much code, if any at all" attitude expect to pay for a website, an associated and linked blog and web hosting services? And exactly how much support would be available (I need patient babysitters equipped with a sense of humour and an appreciation for the absurd.)And what the heck is "tat"?

  6. 'tat' = crap, garbage, useless.

    Pay... go look at the hosting page for a typical view:
    http://wordpress.org/hosting

    $10 / month would be at the very top end of what you want - even $8 would probably suffice..
    Help - there is always the wordpress.org/support forums, codex and other resources available.

  7. But is there anything out there that we can host our own sites but you guys take care of all the technical problems? I would pay more than that a month but I found out that I would have to take care of all the problems that would happen which I know nothing about. And that freaking WhoIs is another issue with me because all our personal information is put out there unless the company puts their own information out on WhoIs.

  8. Whois - move your domain registration to a place such as http://namecheap.com and they'll hide it. (There are others, I mention them only because I use them). It was $8.88 inc whois protection last time I was there.

    'technical problems' - as in?

  9. A friend of mine has her own private hosting company and she was going to host me but she started talking about how I would have to deal with all the things like FTP files or whenever anything goes wrong, I would have to deal with it. I thought that all I would have to do is pay the monthly fee, and then do my blogging as I'm doing now. She said that alot of people think it's that easy but it's not.

  10. There's a pending IDP against any domain with hidden domain registration on their record as there's an RFC against it. A "fairly large" ISP is spearheading it as a stand against spam. We've been discussing it in some of the System Admin email lists over the last few weeks.

    Best bet is to flat out lie in the info. Not that I would tell anyone that. Submit it first with the correct stuff so that a chargeplate will go through and then change it to something that looks correct. Just don't throw up all '5's for the phone number. :)

    Either that or have your hoster register it for you. (That's what I do and put in the address for the homeless shelter I volenteer at since I sort the mail three times a week anyway)

  11. nosysnoop has said: A friend of mine has her own private hosting company and she was going to host me but she started talking about how I would have to deal with all the things like FTP files or whenever anything goes wrong, I would have to deal with it. I thought that all I would have to do is pay the monthly fee, and then do my blogging as I'm doing now. She said that alot of people think it's that easy but it's not.

    Well, I'm coming from the same place as nosysnoop. I want to pay a fee and blog like I do here without sweating about any technical "tat" at all. When I looked into hosting locally I was told the same thing nosysnoop was told. But I repeat I don't want to deal with the technical "tat" at all, so is there any paid web hosting service like the "full service" we get from WP here out there?

  12. 99% of the hosts out there have an autoinstaller that will put in WordPress for you automaticly or will install it for you without cost. Updates as well.

    I think that that's one of the "selling points" with WP.com and other journal sites. You don't have to worry about the backend stuff, just the blogging.

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