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I know WordPress doesn't care about its users but

  1. antheastunning
    Member

    I know WordPress doesn't care about its users but I'm making my peace with that. It's a company and it wants to make money. Money comes from ad revenue which comes from a higher number of users. I know that's why WordPress values it's spam users more than regular users; spam users increase the page views more which increase ad revenue.

    That being said, why is it still not possible to turn off likes in the reader? I don't have likes on my blog because almost all of the likes I was getting were spam. I still get spam likes because the reader lets people like my posts.

    Also, why can I not delete followers? My follower count is nowhere close to accurate because I have tons of spam followers. Why can't I delete them if I can demonstrate that they are spam follows?

    Am I bitter? Of course! I've dealt with these issues for ages and nothing has been done. WordPress could try and prove me wrong, but its not going too. It likes spam and nothing is going to change. I guess I just wanted to know if anyone else feels that some changes are necessary.

    The blog I need help with is smartstunningsearching.wordpress.com.

  2. Also, why can I not delete followers?

    We cannot block specific IP addresses because they are not unique and have not been for over a decade. ISPs place hundreds of us in the same IP block to save money. Only about 30 - 40% of the IP addresses actually trace back to an individual computer and those numbers are descending. More to the point is many have dynamic IPs (ever changing IP addresses).

    Anyone can get a new IP in a couple of minutes.
    Anyone can get a new email address in a couple of minutes.
    Anyone with internet access can subscribe to any public blog in a feedreader.
    Anyone with internet access can read any public blog.

    Blocking would be a useless exercise.

  3. antheastunning
    Member

    No it wouldn't! It would be similar to whack a mole. I block one, I can block another one. I'm okay with having to do this once a week; it needs to be an option. People who think it's not worthwhile don't have to cut down their followers, but those who do should be able to.

  4. antheastunning
    Member

    Also, I'm not talking about blocking IP addresses. I'm talking about blocking specific blocks! I know that IP address change; I have a mobile, a tablet, a computer, and sometimes I blog on my school computer. We should be able to block usernames.

  5. antheastunning
    Member

    Sorry, blocking specific USERS.

  6. I have the same problem. Lately a lot of my "new" followers have been creepy spammers trying to sell me everything from self-help books to car insurance to human hair. I wish I could get rid of them because it does not reflect reality when seeing how many people are actually reading my blog. I want to know who is following me and who is really in my community. Sign. I wish I could block specific followers and bogus blogs too. It is so frustrating.

    At least the SPAM filters on those who comment are working (like a charm)

  7. I can appreciate your frustration at having people follow or like your blog that you don't have control over.

    However, there really isn't a good way to test to see if a like or follow is legitimate without requiring way more data than any of our readers would feel comfortable sharing.

    In other words, in order to use WordPress.com, do you want us to track every site you've visited, and how many other sites you've liked or followed, so we can see if there's a pattern? We certainly don't want to have that kind of data on our users.

    Likes and followers, even from those you might find objectionable, can't hurt your blog, and unless you make your blog private, we can't stop the general public from reading or engaging with it as they see fit. Instead, we see these as opportunities for you to build an audience and engage with readers.

    We do provide site stats so you can see how many people have actually visited your site and which posts they've clicked on, as well as where they're coming from, so hopefully that is at least somewhat meaningful.

  8. "Likes and followers, even from those you might find objectionable, can't hurt your blog, and unless you make your blog private, we can't stop the general public from reading or engaging with it as they see fit. Instead, we see these as opportunities for you to build an audience and engage with readers."

    The original poster isn't talking about the "general public", or followers/commentators who genuinely want to engage with our posts. They're talking about likes and followers whose sole purpose is to publicize the name/location of their commercial website. And yes, it does hurt our blogs' credibility if the majority of our followers are "make money now" type websites.

    If we can moderate for spam comments, we should be able to moderate for spam followers as well.

  9. @jackiedana

    In other words, in order to use WordPress.com, do you want us to track every site you've visited, and how many other sites you've liked or followed, so we can see if there's a pattern? We certainly don't want to have that kind of data on our users.

    From this page: https://wordpress.com/settings/account/

    Privacy
    We use some third party tools to collect data about how users interact with our site. You can find more information about how we use these tools in our privacy policy. If you'd prefer that we not track your interactions you may opt out by using the following links:

    Inspectlet.com opt-out | Kissmetrics.com opt-out

  10. Inspectlet provides usability testing for your website, eye tracking heatmaps, and real-time analytics. Take the tour http://www.inspectlet.com/feature/session-recording

    kissmetrics.com - Google Analytics tells you what happened, KISSmetrics tells you who did it. When we understand our customers, we understand how to grow our business. KISSmetrics tracks real people—where they come from, what they do, and who purchases.
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  11. I also get quite a few spam followers.

    This problem could be easily solved by allowing the users to block other users from following their blogs - like it is the case on so many other sites.

    If it is my blog then it makes sense that I should be allowed to decide myself who can follow it.

  12. @timethief, we do track some information about user activity, but most of it is in the aggregate, not for specific users. We also have nothing on the scale that would allow us to determine if someone was posting "legitimate" likes or not. To try to determine a user's motivation in liking or following a post/blog it would require a very different type of data than what we collect now.

  13. @jackiedana
    Thanks for the clarity. It's appreciated.

  14. @jackiedana, the motivations are pretty obvious for a "like" or a follow from a website which is a "make money blogging" website. Especially when the same user likes multiple posts in way more time than it would actually take to read all of the posts.

  15. omegasupreme78
    Member

    I'm having problems with this, too. I made a post about family trouble tonight, and within seconds I got 'followed' by a site trying to sell me spray paint.

    It's obviously an issue that's bothering us, and a 'Block User' button would be simple to implement. Their IP and email addresses don't matter. The point is they're annoying. And if they want to go and make up a whole new user name just to re-follow us, we can just block them again.

    It would be more work for them to keep going through the sign-up process than it would for us to just hit that 'Block' button again once in a while.

  16. antheastunning
    Member

    I have an idea!

    I have 232 followers. I expect at least 100 are spam. Let me place the other 132 followers onto an authentic followers list.

    To further clarify, let me create a followers list that I can remove names from. The spam followers I remove from my personalised list will still be listedas following my blog (since WordPress seems so determined that there's nothing they can do about that. Pageviews revenue, you know?), but the spammers won't be on my new legitimate followers list.

    Essentially, we'll still have the followers list as it stands now, with an additional list that exists only as a reference for users to keep track of which followers are not spam.

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