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Password/log-in period expiring in the middle of editing a post

  1. I'm trying real hard right now not to lose my temper -- this isn't the first time this has happened, but it's definitely the worst. I just spent two hours editing a post, only to get a message to log in again when I tried to save the draft. I went to another screen to log in, which has worked before and allowed me to not lose any of the edits, but this time when I went back to my original screen and saved the draft, I found all of my work for the past two hours was gone. Apparently the password expired shortly after I began editing the draft.
    You really need to change that! There is no reason under the sun for a person's password/log-in period to expire in the middle of editing a post! It's very, very, very, very AGGRAVATING!!! Am I making myself clear????!!!!!!
    Blog url: http://bestdoubles.wordpress.com/

  2. Very clear. And this sort of problem is very unlikely to be to do with WordPress, and very likely to do with your browser. So here are the steps to take:

    Try these steps:

    Clear your cache and then log back in to your wordpress.com account.

    If that doesn't help, disenable any browser add ons you might have and if that makes a difference, gradually re-enable them to see which was the culprit.

    Update Flash

    Update your browser

    Try a different browser.

    You can achieve the last two options via this:

    http://browsehappy.com/

    Also kindly realise that most of the people who help on the forums here are volunteers. In other words 'ordinary' people like you who are just more experienced than you with the site. So losing your temper will help none of us.

  3. I appreciate the advice and most of what you covered I've done. I'm using Firefox, which was just updated last week. And I cleared the cache before going to the new post screen. When I saw I was still logged in after clearing the cache, I was surprised, but since I was having no problem on the screen I was on, I didn't think there was a problem. I also had another screen open with my blog on it, and was clicking on old posts on that screen to get information -- and was logged in normally on it.

    I've noticed that generally I have to log back into WordPress about once every two weeks. That happens on two different PC-type computers, as well as on an Ipad. So it seems that what happened in the instance described in the first message above was that the two week period had expired while I was on the new post screen, editing the post.

    Is that periodic re-logging into WordPress something others aren't experiencing? Since it's happened on three different computers, I assumed that a normal occurrence.

  4. I've been volunteering here for two years and unless my memory is playing tricks on me, I don't recall seeing this problem before. But the fact that you're getting this on different computers seems very odd so I'll mark this for staff to look at, though you'll need to be patient as they don't always respond quickly or at all at the weekend.

    Ah - one thing might be causing it, possibly. Have you got third party cookies allowed? Because that - or making exceptions for your particular wordpress.com sites - is essential. I do the latter and make sure cookies are allowed specifically for wordpress.com (in Firefox, via tools - options - exceptions - then add the URL or URLS to the field provided and click 'Allow'. The ones to set are wordpress.com and wp.com but to be on the safe side, also set them for your blog URLS.

    When did you update Firefox, by the way, and to what? If it was to version 16, you need to update to 16.1 as soon as possible as apparently it had a bug which Firefox have just rectified with the new update.

    Anyway, I'm going to step aside and leave this one to staff now, but I do suggest that you try setting exceptions for the cookies and see if that helps. Good luck!

  5. Yes, please make sure that you have third-party cookies enabled: http://en.support.wordpress.com/third-party-cookies/

  6. Yep -- third party cookies are enabled, and I'm on Firefox version 16.1.

    What I'm still wondering is whether the password I use for WordPress is set to expire after a specific period of time. I haven't tracked it to the day, but it about every two weeks I have to log in again.

    Actually, I just realized that may be misleading. It isn't the password itself that expires, it's the logged-in view that expires. By that I mean the view that shows the statistics bar at the top of the page, and allows access to the Dashboard. So after a period of about two weeks, when I pull up the blog, I find I have to log in once more (using the same password) in order to get to the user/member screens -- otherwise, I'm looking at the same screen a reader would see who didn't have a WordPress account.

    In other words, it appears to me that after a user logs in, a log-in period of about two weeks begins. When that period expires, apparently automatically, the user has to log in once more in order to get access to the screens for editing, statistics, etc.

    Now is that specific issue something others are experiencing? I would assume it's normal, since I see it happen on two different PC's and on an I-Pad.

  7. Oh, that's entirely normal. You do have to log in again every 2 weeks.

  8. Well I thought that two expiration of the log-in period was normal, so that leads me back to my original problem.

    What happened was after I had started to edit a post, that log-in period expired. I had actually saved the draft once, and then it was saved automatically shortly after that. At some point shortly after the first (and last) auto-save -- and without my being aware of it -- the log-in period expired. I was relying on the auto-save feature throughout the rest of the editing process, and when I was finished, I attempted to save the draft as normal, and it was at that point that a screen opened up requiring me to log in once again.

    That screen doesn't include my saved password, and since I didn't have it handy at the moment, I opened a second WordPress screen and logged in from a page that has the password saved. When I returned to my original edit screen, I discovered I was looking at the screen that was active right after the first auto-save had taken place. All of the work I had done from that point on was gone.

    The frustrating thing is I've had that happen before, and I thought I was avoiding a repeat of it by saving the draft right at the beginning to make sure the log-in period was still active.

    It looks like the only way to avoid the situation is to either write down the date every time I refresh the log-in period, or log in just prior to editing a post to avoid the situation.

    What I would have really appreciated was some kind of message on the screen notifying me that the log-in period had expired and needed to be refreshed. There's no way a user is aware that has happened until they attempt to save the draft or publish it. And a new user has no idea that can even happen until the first time they encounter it.

    I'm sure I'm not the first person who has lost work due to this. If it's at all possible, it could be avoided by either a screen message when the password expires, or a warning screen of some kind to remind the user when the password is within 24 hours of expiring.

  9. A lot of work seems to me for not very many people - how about you just log in once a week - maybe every Monday??

  10. The system logging you out while you're in the middle of typing or editing a post is not right. I can't imaging that even with an auto-log off, that it is meant to do that while you're working on something.

    Personally, I've never had any of these problems but that could be because, for the sake of security, I log out of my account every day - usually before I turn off the computer at night. It really is not secure being logged in all the time and that's something you might like to consider.

    The other thing I would suggest - if you don't already do this - is to log in via https instead of http. Here's how to set that up:

    http://en.support.wordpress.com/https/

    and for some extra ideas, here's the page about security here:

    http://en.support.wordpress.com/security/

    Addressing the matter of losing your post - there are other things that can occur here than getting logged out which can lose you your work, so here is our most experienced volunteer's advice on what to do to avoid that (and how to find drafts that have been 'lost':

    http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/how-do-i-recover-lost-content-that-was-published-but-deleted-in-an-update?replies=5#post-1026355

    Please click on and visit these links and read them - they could save you an awful lot of grief!

  11. Thanks very much. I'll go the https route, and I can see the best thing to do is log out every night, which will avoid the situation entirely.

    I realize I should save the draft more frequently, if for no other reason than a momentary power failure or interruption of that sort. Normally I do that, but there are times when I become so focused on the words that all thought of saving the draft evaporates. For that reason, the auto-save feature really becomes valuable.

    Still, some day when a programmer is looking for something useful to add to WordPress, adding a warning of some kind about the log-in period expiring shortly would be a welcome addition. It's one of those things that a user doesn't even know can take place -- until it happens.

    Many thanks, once again!

  12. You're welcome and as an extra tip, before you type anything at all in your post, type one character (for instance an 'x') and save the draft, as the auto-save only kicks in after youv'e saved something for the first time. Then just delete the character and type your post. And keep saving! Don't rely on the autosave.

  13. Or better yet, get an offline editor such as Windows Live Writer so your work will be saved to your own computer:
    http://weblogs.about.com/od/offlineblogeditors/tp/Top5OfflineBlogEditors.htm
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-live/essentials-other-programs

    Or in the text editor, use your browser to "copy all" and save your drafts regularly. If a save draft is lost, you can paste the code back into the text editor, and you'll not have lost your work.

  14. And whatever route you take, this is true with any software on a computer: save early and save often.

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