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Read a book, write a book

  1. When I read a blog I have never visited before, I often want to go to the beginning and read it in chronological order. Why does that have to be so hard?

    The Write a Book support page says, "A blog is, essentially, a reverse chronological publishing tool" but that's not really true. The "reverse" bit is just a DESC in some SQL query, which could just as easily be an ASC.

    WordPress users who think of themselves as writers of stories would appreciate being able to make reading from the start the default, and reading from the start within a category would help them to publish multiple, separate stories.

  2. For people who wish to use a wordpress.com blog to write a book:
    http://en.support.wordpress.com/write-a-book/

    If you want to read a blog from the beginning, you can go to the archive or calendar widget (if the blogger has one), and go to the earliest month, earliest day, and begin reading. You can then read through each post in chronological order.

    If the blogger hasn't provided a widget for easily finding old posts, one can always just keep clicking "older posts" to get to the first ones, and then read them in order. There's probably another way of getting to the first post in a blog, but it hasn't been anything I've tried to do.

    A person who writes stories can also have separate PAGES for chapters or short stories, rather than dated posts, and then use the custom menus to organize them. http://en.support.wordpress.com/post-vs-page/
    http://en.support.wordpress.com/menus/

  3. Most blogs are set up this way (I'd say "all," but that would be "all blogs in my experience"). There may be some blogging platforms that allow the blogger to choose to have results display in chron order rather than reverse chron order, but that would still be a blogger choice, not a reader choice.

    Once a person has visited and explored a blog, when they return, they will want to see fresh, new content. In addition, if someone is writing a "newsy" blog, fresher content may have more relevance than older content, and the same would be true of blogs discussing tech how-tos, since technology is changing.

    I do enjoy reading older posts on a blog I've just discovered, but I've never found it difficult to do so -- and for a blog with many entries, I usually read the posts that jump out at me and interest me most.

    Many blogs, unless they're travelogues or something similar, aren't dependent on knowing a "back story." For example, I often visit recipe and cooking sites. I may hop around and look at different categories of recipes, but if I'm looking for rajma, I'm not going to care whether the blogger wrote the post before or after their entry on saag paneer.

    If a reverse chron blog isn't appropriate for a particular writer, then they can find another way to present their material on the web. I personally find the reverse chron order just fine for my purposes, and I have an archives widget an calendar widget for anyone who may be interested in reading older posts. I also use tags & categories to organise my posts, and use pages for more "timeless" content. I find the web -- and blogging -- to be a very flexible medium, much more so than a paper book in which every page follows in sequence. Especially for reference works, html/xhtml is great -- and it isn't dependent upon either chronological order or physical order and can actually provide a better tool for the user. Though I admit that I do still love books and the printed page! :)

  4. I would just makes categories chapters of the book

  5. "Chronological" order is from oldest to newest. "Reverse chronological" is from newest to oldest.

  6. chronological |ˌkränlˈäjikəl|
    adjective
    relating to the establishment of dates and time sequences : the diary provided a chronological framework for the events.
    • (of a record of several events) starting with the earliest and following the order in which they occurred : the entries are in chronological order.

  7. I just use Word Press to practice writing, sometimes not writing anything for a while makes me stagnant. I agree with the previous statement of making categories chapters, it's a clever idea.

  8. One could also use the archives shortcode on a page or post to make an index of posts so readers could easily choose which chapter (or article) to read:
    http://en.support.wordpress.com/archives-shortcode/

  9. This is alright. But I suggest not to use any blog-to-book services, like fastpencil.com to create an ebook from your blog. I have a bitter experience with these services. They can damage your security, as usually they ask for username and password.

  10. They don't just require an xml file or other export? I sure wouldn't let some unknowns have access to any of my online logins.

    The category & archives ideas are very good ones, too.

  11. This is from FastPencil (the blog-to-book site mentioned by WordPress on their "write a book" page):

    Can I turn my blog into a book?
    Yes! Our blog import tool makes it easy to grab your existing blog posts, whether for use as a compilation or for use in a completely new work. You have three options:

    RSS Feed: Just enter the blog’s url and we will retrieve up to 25 posts.
    Sign in to your blog, retrieve up to 500 posts
    Export your WordPress or Blogger blog, and import the corresponding xml file

    It seems pretty clear here that you can use RSS or an xml file to publish your book. I don't know how much access, if any, they'd have when you "sign into your blog, retrieve up to 500 posts," but certainly with the other two methods, they'd have no access at all.

    http://www.fastpencil.com/
    http://en.support.wordpress.com/write-a-book/

  12. I tried both. First uploaded xml file and when it didn't work, signed in. Actually I write math formulae using LaTeX codes and you can see that both in feed and blog, they appear as images, which is done by using $latex $. When I uploaded my .xml file, I didn't found latex images in my Ebook, but only $latex $ typed texts (were found). Later I tried to do it by using SignIn method, but still the same happened. And after generating my ebook (in pdf), I was forced to go to home of the site. There was nothing like signout. I couldn't understand what happened, but because of fear -I changed my WP.COM password.

  13. Oh.. I misused code tag.
    HERE IS ORIGINAL POST:
    I tried both. First uploaded xml file and when it didn't work, signed in. Actually I write math formulae using LaTeX codes and you can see that both in feed and blog, they appear as images, which is done by using $latex code$. When I uploaded my .xml file, I didn't found latex images in my Ebook, but only $latex code$ typed texts (were found). Later I tried to do it by using SignIn method, but still the same happened. And after generating my ebook (in pdf), I was forced to go to home of the site. There was nothing like signout. I couldn't understand what happened, but because of fear -I changed my WP.COM password.

  14. Please see here > Bloggers: Publish your book, ebook, or your blog > http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2010/08/03/bloggers-publish-your-book-ebook-or-your-blog/ The post contains 5 free ways to do this and 3 more ways that are paid.

  15. @timethief :-) Actually this was your blog which made me aware about fastpencil. Otherwise I didn't know it.

  16. Aha! Too bad the LaTeX codes seem to beproblematic. Have you contacted FastPencil support and asked for help? http://www.fastpencil.com/company/help

  17. No. But I'll try again and they surely contact.

  18. No. But I'll try it again and then
    surely contact.

  19. It seems as if there are some blogs that are more along the lines of a "hit or miss" proposition. Some are set in a tight time logical order (kronos logica), while some are free-flowing and random in approach.

    Actually, I enjoy both for different reasons. When I am in my "writer's mode" the tighter method seems to satisfy my academic instincts; yet when I am in a more relaxed frame of mind, I am delighted to ride along with the more free spirited bloggers.

    Just a shared thought.

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