Need help? Check out our Support site, then


Accessibility plugins as standard?

  1. In general, it is important for disability equality for accessibility plugins to be included in the standard WordPress.com plugins. Disabled people have different, sometimes competing, accessibility requirements and plugins with personalised options can meet these more successfully than themes. I'm thinking of plugins such as Accessibility, WP accessibility helper, and Responsive Voice text to speech which are available for WordPress.org sites.

    In particular, we're just starting a research project for people with chronic illness disability. I'm investigating the best option for a hassle free blog/site with our own domain name. The Personal Plan on WordPress.com looks like a good option, but I need to check it meets our access requirements. Is it possible for us to use accessibility plugins on a WordPress.com Personal Plan with own domain?

  2. Hello,

    You can find themes that have been tested for accessibility here: https://theme.wordpress.com/themes/features/accessibility-ready/

  3. Hi

    I did have a brief look at the accessible themes filter, but when I read more detail they don't necessarily meet AA or AAA standards, just some basic settings. Do you know of any which meet this criteria?

    Also there won't be a one sized solution for our participants. Plugins are better than themes (although it would obviously also be good to pick a more accessible theme). I'm after using the plugins where users can choose their own preference. Sometimes accessibility needs oppose each other.

    For example, those standard measures of accessibility give points for high colour contrast. This is good for people who have some visual impairment. However, our participants are more likely to want low contrast or muted colours, due to sensory overload type issues.

    A similar issue is people with standard dyslexia tend to prefer sans serif typeface but people with ME acquired dyslexia can prefer serif text as the little lines anchor the text to the line (otherwise lines of text can appear to bend). We'll likely include people with both issues!

    The best solution seems to be to give the option for people to choose their display style.

  4. In terms of the theme I'd probably go for Twentysixteen.

    Accessibility report: http://wave.webaim.org/report#/https://twentysixteendemo.wordpress.com/

  5. Hi,

    We are also working in developing accessible websites, considering initially basic settings such as resize text button, change contrast button and AltText image description.

    Could you please share with us your experiences on using the Accessibility Plugins? (if you already did it), mainly WP Acessibility. We are deciding if we contract the Business WordPress Plan or an experienced developer. (We are more tending to the 1st option)

    Also, do you have any tip of website that is using the WP Plugin for us to test?

    Thanks!

Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

About this Topic