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Sharing (crossposting) blog posts on other sites. Bad?

  1. I use my main blog for posting movie reviews. Every so-often I get a request from other sites / blogs that they would like to share one of my reviews with their own blog readers by duplicating the content and posting it themselves on their site. They are happy to credit me as part of the review and I would allow them to editorialise it to whatever degree they like (if at all). However, I'm now a big concerned that they will be getting penalized in SEO terms for duplicating my content, despite my giving permission. My posts will have been indexed by the site engines before they get posted elsewhere, so I imagine I would be identified as the original poster and not be penalised myself, but I worry about the effect it has on the other blog sites.

    Is this a valid concern, or as I'm only a small-scale blogger (as too are the sites wishing to use my content), is it not something that I need to worry about. Should I tell them they can't use my content because it will harm their own site rankings if they do?

    The same question could be asked about blogs who aggregate content from numerous sites. None of them are 'content farms' in that sense, but the content is duplicated from elsewhere. Anyone have any knowledge in this area?

    The blog I need help with is trioxin.wordpress.com.

  2. Yes it's a valid concern. Search engines like Google aim to provide the most freah and relevant content to those using search engines. Do to the flood of duplicates from those who publish the same dang article on multiple sites appearing in search results, they have introduced the Panda algorithm update aimed to get all the duplicate content that drives those using search utilities crazy. We only need it to appear once thanks!

    This is what Google says about handling duplicate content.

    However, in some cases, content is deliberately duplicated across domains in an attempt to manipulate search engine rankings or win more traffic. Deceptive practices like this can result in a poor user experience, when a visitor sees substantially the same content repeated within a set of search results. http://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=66359

  3. Thanks for the reply. From reading this I would make an assumption that if a searcher was looking for a review of a film I have covered then Google would identify that there is a duplicate post elsewhere and only return the original post in the rankings (or perhaps if the syndicated site has a higher Page Rank (such as IMDB) then that would be returned instead? - another assumption there!).

    I guess that means there's no penalisation for the actual sites themselves, only for the duplicate content pages within that site.

    Provided the other sites have plenty of original content themselves the only possible issue would be with the individual pages of duplicate content.

  4. Both the original site and the sites duplicates are found on can be negatively effected ie. Google can and has dropped both into the supplementary index in some cases.
    Matt Cutts video > How can I make sure that Google knows my content is original?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LsB19wTt0Q&feature=player_embedded

    Further reading on the Google Panda Algorithm update:
    Why you should offer partial feeds after Google Panda Update
    http://www.shoutmeloud.com/why-you-should-offers-partial-feeds-after-google-panda-update.html
    The Panda that hates farms (Matt Cutts and Amit Singhal Wired interview)
    http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/03/the-panda-that-hates-farms/

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