Why do you feel the need to suggest that any reader will be the "first" to "like

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  • #1260320

    boblitton
    Member

    This is not really a question, just a comment/criticism. One of my posts (“Secular Epiphanies”) attracted a little over 30 visitors over the past four days, yet no one indicated that they liked the essay. For evidentiary reasons I won’t bother you with, I believe that at least more than half of the readers did like the essay. I’m supposing that one, if not the only, reason they didn’t press the “Like” button is they were turned off by the sentence right below the button: “Be the first to like this.” Do you folks realize what a negative vibe that message sends out? I believe everyone would benefit if you simply deleted that remark. (But leave the button!!!)
    Thank you.
    Bob Litton

    The blog I need help with is boblitton.wordpress.com.

    #1260617

    kraftbj
    Staff

    Thanks for the suggestion. Your logic makes sense to me. Personally, I think plenty of folks don’t want to be the “first” at anything and calling that out could be counterproductive.

    #1260620

    boblitton
    Member

    Thank you for responding. At least one person got my point.

    #1260621

    I have no objections to changing that phrase but I don’t have the same response that you indicate to it. It’s not at all off putting to me.

    Likes may make us feel warm and fuzzy but they aren’t page view stats. The like button is for “in-house” users ie. only those who have WordPress.com/Gravatar accounts and who are logged in can use them.

    Likes and shares are misleading in the context of page view stats. Your followers and anyone with a WordPress.com blog who is logged into WordPress.com can “like” and “share” your posts in several locations such as in email and the Reader without ever clicking into your blog and creating a page view stat.

    I choose to control the length of the post entry sent out on my RSS feed here > Settings > Reading by choosing the “summary” setting for your RSS feed or the “full text”. That means visitors have to click into the blog to read the full post.

    #1260622

    May I also add that I value comments over and above like button clicks as there are like button spammers who have corrupted the use of the like button. As we cannot remove followers or remove fake likes we have no reliable way to gauge audience growth.

    #1260623

    boblitton
    Member

    Your first paragraph is clear enough. The succeeding ones, however, get more and more technical through that last paragraph, which is totally cryptic.

    View the “Like” message from my angle. I read it as, potentially, saying: “Nobody who has read this post until now has liked it, so your vote will be a kind action and, at the same time, show you are one of the avant garde set who value innovation when you see it.” The whole setup is like one of those optical illusions we used to find in Psychology 101 textbooks.

    What little I perceive from your message is that “Only users of WordPress are going to see that ‘Like’ button, so don’t expect any ‘Visitors’ from search engines or referrers like the New York Times to have the opportunity to pat you on the back.

    I would appreciate it if the non-member readers could indicate “Like” or “Don’t Like”, because that way I would be able to determine whether they had read the post on purpose or had just had happened to visit by a misdirection in their Internet surfing. However, I don’t want to complicate matters and I do appreciate your responding. I did learn something…I think.

    Thank you for responding.

    #1260624

    What little I perceive from your message is that “Only users of WordPress are going to see that ‘Like’ button, so don’t expect any ‘Visitors’ from search engines or referrers like the New York Times to have the opportunity to pat you on the back.

    Correct.

    I would appreciate it if the non-member readers could indicate “Like” or “Don’t Like”, because that way I would be able to determine whether they had read the post on purpose or had just had happened to visit by a misdirection in their Internet surfing.

    That’s not possible and I wanted to make that clear to you.

    #1260625

    Let me qualify “correct”. Above I said:

    Your followers and anyone with a WordPress.com blog who is logged into WordPress.com can “like” and “share” your posts in several locations such as in email and the Reader without ever clicking into your blog and creating a page view stat.

    To make it clear that WordPress.com/Gravatar accounts are one in the same as both are owned by Automattic.
    http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2013/04/09/wordpress-com-follower-management/

    This would be an improvement:

    Your followers and anyone with a WordPress.com or Gravatar account who is logged in can “like” and “share” your posts in several locations such as in email and the WordPress.com Reader without ever clicking into your blog and creating a page view stat.

    #1260626

    Oy vey! I posted the wrong link. Here’s the correct link http://blog.gravatar.com/2013/04/03/gravatar-and-wordpress-com-together-forever/

    #1260627

    boblitton
    Member

    BTW, I like your hairdo, but isn’t it a little bit difficult driving with just one eye?

    #1260628

    timethief
    Member

    I usually clip it back so it’s not obscuring my vision. :D

    #1260631

    boblitton
    Member

    Back to business. I have a question — nothing urgent, but if and when you can find time I wish you would satisfy my curiosity.

    Recently I have been fortunate in twice attracting readers from one of our big dailies. In the last incident, I have noticed that readers continue to dribble in even though the newspaper article I lured them from is now (after nearly two weeks) practically in the archives of that publication. I wondered how this favorable wind could keep blowing. It occurred to me that possibly one reader would pass on the referrer’s inclusion of my URL to friends via Twitter or another social system. However, a friend who is more of a computer adept than I told me, “No, because then the referrer would be Twitter, not the newspaper.” Do you have any insight on this question? As I said, it is not an urgent matter, but I would like to hear from you or someone from wherever you are.
    Thanks.
    BL

    #1260633

    aliceharding
    Member

    Some might be as they read the newspaper somewhere else other than by the PC so made a note to check in to look – I’ve done that many a time.

    #1260641

    I personally think its ridiculous. lol who cares. (nicely)

    #1260642

    boblitton
    Member

    Thanks for your support.
    Doesn’t look like the format is going to change though.
    BL

    #1260654

    boblitton
    Member

    This message is for “ThisTimeThisSpace” or “TimeThief”. (I have received messages from her with both “user”names.) Are you out there?

    You said in one of your remarks that you prefer “Comments” to “Likes”. I would prefer comments, too, but the comments I’ve received thus far have basically been spam, as far as I can tell; some are totally off topic and most are pure gibberish. Early on I received emails from WP that certain bloggers had liked particular essays and had described them as “quite awesome”. However, the sender of the emails was some gatekeeper at WP — not the bloggers themselves — and “awesome” has by now spiked to the level of a Himalayan peak as one of the tritest words of the 21st century: it says nothing. I therefore signaled WP not to send me any more such emails.

    It would, in fact, be pleasant to receive a “Comment” from someone — blogger or whomever doesn’t matter — reveals some appreciation or a constructive criticism or adds another bit of information to the essay’s thematic content.

    #1260655

    boblitton
    Member

    This message is for “ThisTimeThisSpace” or “TimeThief”. (I have received messages from her with both “user”names.) Are you out there?

    You said in one of your remarks that you prefer “Comments” to “Likes”. I would prefer comments, too, but the comments I’ve received thus far have basically been spam, as far as I can tell; some are totally off topic and most are pure gibberish. Early on I received emails from WP that certain bloggers had liked particular essays and had described them as “quite awesome”. However, the sender of the emails was some gatekeeper at WP — not the bloggers themselves — and “awesome” has by now spiked to the level of a Himalayan peak as one of the tritest words of the 21st century: it says nothing. I therefore signaled WP not to send me any more such emails.

    It would, in fact, be pleasant to receive a “Comment” from someone — blogger or whomever doesn’t matter — reveals some appreciation or a constructive criticism or adds another bit of information to the essay’s thematic content.

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